Club History


W9ATG

Year AcquiredLicense HolderLocation
1921Maynard R. BriggsSt. Paul, MN
1924Earl BeckwithPleasantville, IA
1925Joseph LesmeisterHarvey, ND
1926Phillip E. HallerChicago, IL
1931Leslie R. MatsonFort Dodge, KS
1940Charles L. CordermanWaterloo, IA
1947Phillip N. MacyGreenfield, IN
1961Hancock Amateur Radio ClubGreenfield, IN

The W9ATG callsign was first issued in 1921 to Maynard Briggs in St. Paul, MN and it would be reassigned to six other amateur operators over the years before the club acquired it in 1961.

The last person to hold the call sign before HARC was Phillip N. Macy, a resident of Greenfield who was in a partnership with his father-in-law W.O. Pope, owner of Pope Products, a local steel fabrication facility on S. Harrison Street – now known as Custom Metal Products on E. Main Street.  In February 1960 at the age of 38 Phillip passed away while at work after suffering a heart attack.

Phillip received his amateur radio license in 1947 at the age of 25 and at the time of his passing he was the President of the Hancock Amateur Radio Club. Even before the club was formed in March 1959, Phillip began offering back-to-back classes in 1953 at his home in the evenings on Jefferson Boulevard to anyone seeking a novice license. A graduate of Greenfield High School, he was also known as a semi-professional baseball pitcher in addition to being a World War II Coast Guard veteran.

As a tribute to his contributions to Amateur Radio in our community Phillips call sign was adopted by the Hancock Amateur Radio Club.


March 1959: Organizational Meeting

Radio Club for Amateurs Set
Organization Meeting Wednesday, March 11

All license amateur radio operators in Hancock county are asked to attend a meeting called by Howard Grubbs, the American Radio Relay League Emergency Co-ordinator for Hancock County, Wednesday, March 11th at 7:30 p.m. in the Hoosier Soft Water Co. building, 25 E. Pierson Street, Greenfield.

The purpose of the meeting is to form a Radio Club and to organize the radio operators in the county into an Amateur Radio Emergency Corp.

There are 25 known licensed operators in the county, said Mr. Grubbs and close to a 100 percent turn out is expected.

To any persons interested who are not licensed operators, there is a code class being held at the home of Phil Macy, 77 Jefferson Blvd., Greenfield, on Tuesday evenings at 7 o’clock (DST). This class has just started and anyone wishing to learn the code is invited to attend the classes. Also interested persons are invited to attend the organization meeting, Mr. Grubbs stated.

Amateur radio operators are noted for the services they render in many cases of emergency throughout the country. There have been innumerable times when a stricken community has had no other means of communication with the outside world except by the licensed operators, also the continued experimentations have helped lead the fast growth of radio communications.


March 1959: Club Formation

Amateur Radio Club Organized
Officers Elected At First Meeting

An amateur radio club with twenty charter members to be known as the Hancock Amateur Radio Club has recently been organized in Hancock County, the purpose of which is to unite the amateur operators in this community and to form a group of trained operators and technicians that will be able to set up communications in this county in case of and emergency such as hit central Illinois this past winter.


April 1959: Constitution Reviewed

Amateur Radio Club Organizes
Constitution and Business Talked

The newly organized Hancock Amateur Radio Club was called to order by its president, Howard Grubs, W9DZC, for its regular meeting Monday night, April 13th at the Hoosier Soft Water Company building at 25 E. Pierson Street, in Greenfield with a good crowd in attendance.

Among the visitors present were Cliff Singer, W9SWD, the assistant director of the Central Division of the American Radio Relay League and Dean Townsend, K9JGJ, president of the Western Electric Amateur Radio Club.

Since the club was just recently organized, this meeting was mostly taken up by the reading of the constitution and other pressing business.

Th next scheduled meeting is for Monday night, May 11, ata the same location and at this meeting it is planned to have a talk on the DX operation of an amateur radio station by Harry Franke, W9YSQ, and his son Manford, W9YSX of New Palestine. Harry and Manford are rivals in this work and there is promise of a very interesting program.

The club membership is open to all persons interested in amateur radio and your attendance is needed to boost the club’s prestige in the community.

May 1959: Hancock Civil Defense Suggests Potential Partnership with Club

Amateur Radio Club in Meet
CD Director Makes Brief Talk

The Hancock Amateur radio Club held its regular club meeting recently with 15 present. The meeting was opened with a short talk by Sam Hughes, Civil Defense Director for Hancock County, about the potentialities of the assistance that the club can give to Civil Defense in case a disaster strikes.

President Howard Grubbs (W9DZC) and Charles Haley (K9HWN) gave a short report on their attendance at the amateur get-together in Dayton, Ohio over the weekend of May 9th. This proved to be very interesting and informative.

Phil Macy (W9ATG) gave a report on the progress of his code and theory classes and advised that he has given seven or eight examinations in the past couple of months. This class affords an excellent opportunity for those interested in becoming radio amateurs to learn the fundaments of radio and to obtain their licenses. It is open to all interested persons of any age and of either sex. The class meets each Tuesday at 7 p.m. (EST) at Phil’s home. 77 Jefferson Blvd., Greenfield.

The visitor this month was Walter Foutch (W9CKX) of Pendleton. Walt is chief radio operator for the Pendleton Post of the Indiana State Police.

The next meeting will be held Monday night, June 8, at the Hoosier Soft Water Co. building at 25 East Pierson, in Greenfield. This meeting will be taken up by the annal election of officers, so it is important for all members to be there.